Book Release: Wolf Land Book Six

I can uncross my fingers and toes, because the sixth book of the Wolf Land series, Lord of the Bones, is now for sale on Amazon.

Book CoverBook Six wraps up the story arc that began in Book Four, so for anyone who was worried about a certain character, all is now revealed 🙂

Here’s the blurb:

Did they really believe a Lord would keep his end of the bargain?

The pack travel to New Amsterdam, hoping that they will finally find their leader again.  But once they get there, they have a chilling choice to make.

Lord Ambrose de Jong tells them that Rory will be returned to them, as promised.  But only if they wait until midsummer … and only if they sacrifice another in his place.

After all they have been through, they are unwilling to trust the word of a Lord – and they are certainly not prepared to do as one says.

They attempt to retrieve Rory without the Lord’s help, but it begins to seem like an impossible task.  Luckily for them, an old friend returns from India.  And he might just have the power they need to do things their own way …

Like the rest of the series, this one is in Kindle Unlimited, meaning it’s free to borrow for anyone with a subscription.  The links to all of the stores are:

US UK

DE FR

ES IT   NL  JP  BR  CA  MX  AU  IN

 

 

Book Release: Wolf Land Book Four

Cover Image Book FourWell, I said it would be out in 2016, and I made it … just.

Wolf Land Book Four: Wrath is now available to buy from all of these Amazon Stores for a special release price of 99c/99p (or whatever the equivalent may be in your currency):

US UK DE FR ES IT NL JP BR CA MX AU IN

Oh, and for those of you who enjoy my standalone novels, The Man in the Barn will be along in 2017 🙂

For now, here’s the blurb for Wrath:

Killing a Lord was just the beginning …

All that Sorcha and the werewolves want to do is find a place to call home.  Their numbers are reduced.  They are injured, grieving, and exhausted.  But in the New World, they have a new Lord to worry about.

When Sorcha dreams of a town called Hope Streams, and a young girl accused of witchcraft, the pack know what they ought to do: run very far and very fast in the opposite direction.

There is a Lord at work in Hope Streams, and the whole town lives in fear.  But if they choose to help the people, the pack could lose far more than they know …

 

Book Release: Wolf Land Book Three

Book CoverI’m so happy to announce that Wolf Land Book Three: Divided is now available on Amazon.  Here are the links for the US, UK, CA and Australian stores.  I really hope you guys enjoy reading it, and as soon as I’ve gotten caught up on some sleep, work on Wrath – the fourth book in the series – is set to begin 🙂

Here’s the blurb:

The wolves have been divided, but will they fall?

In the castle’s dungeons, werewolves are being tortured and killed, but is this just another game of Lord Tolbert’s, or does he need the wolves for a darker purpose?

Sorcha Moore has been betrayed, kidnapped, and separated from everyone she cares for.  But who has driven them apart, and why?

Sorcha needs to learn all she can about her enemies – and about herself – if she is ever going to defeat the Lord.  But when she is finally told the truth of the Lords and the werewolves, it may not be the truth she wants to hear.

Will Sorcha return to Wolf Wood in time to save Rory and the wolf pack, or will she do as everyone seems to think she ought … and run?

Irish Werewolves: Share the Lore

Image of WolfWolves and werewolves seem ingrained in the Irish psyche; this can be seen by the fact that we have so many words for them. For wolves we have mac tire and faolchú, and even older words such as bréach. As for werewolves, there’s conroict, faoladh and ferchú. Some Irish names even show our reverence for wolf-like tendencies – O’Faolain means descendant of the wolf-like warrior, and variants of the name can be seen in the anglicized forms of Phelan and Whelan today.

 
My own werewolves aren’t based entirely on Irish myths (the full moon didn’t feature heavily in the stories of old, for example). But for those who are interested in learning more about the werewolves from this island (and other ‘Celtic’ countries), I’ve put together a short list of sites worth visiting, in an effort to do as this blog title suggests: share the lore.

 
In the list below you’ll find many versions of each story to feast upon.  Did going oc faelad (a-wolfing) mean to leave your body (much like the Wargs in A Song of Ice and Fire) and inhabit a wolf for as long as you wished? Or did those going a-wolfing channel the spirit of the wolf in the metaphorical rather than the supernatural sense? Either way, there was often cattle-raiding involved.

 
Were the wolves of Ossory cursed by St Patrick, St Náile, or neither? Perhaps lycanthropy wasn’t considered a curse until the arrival of Christianity.

 
Were there really roving bands of wolf-men, fighting battles and feasting on the slain? Or were the Irish werewolves protectors and guides, as some stories suggest?

 
I’ve listed seven links – one for each year the wolves of Ossory were said to remain in werewolf form 🙂 This is just a small example of what you can find online. Some articles will be informative, and some might just be fun. Some may even contradict each other!!! But that’s the great thing about mythology: just like language, it’s an ever-changing thing, new layers being added with each generation, new variations being invented in each and every tale.

 
There’s a world wide web filled with werewolf lore out there, so click, discover, and enjoy 🙂

 
https://earthandstarryheaven.com/2015/05/13/irish-werewolves/ – In this blog by author Sheena McGrath, she does a great job of summing up Irish werewolf lore, but also links to many other blogs on the subject. I’ve listed this blog because Sheena’s lovely links provide a good starting point for anyone interested in delving further.

 
http://www.davidjonfuller.com/2012/10/17/interview-dr-phillip-bernhardt-house-on-celtic-werewolves/ – David Jon Fuller interviews Dr Phillip Bernhardt-House, author of Werewolves, Magical Hounds, and Dog-Headed Men in Celtic Literature.

 
http://dunsgathan.net/feannog/wolfshape.pdf – a great article by Saigh Kym Lambert about taking on the Wolf Shape.

 
http://livinglibraryblog.com/?p=656 – a blog by Shanon Sinn about the Celtic Werewolf.

 
http://www.luminarium.org/mythology/ireland/werewolves.htm – an excerpt from the “Topographia Hibernica” about the wolves of Ossory.

 
http://www.werewolves.com/legendary-irish-wolf-warriors/ – a great site for werewolf lovers, this particular article discusses whether the wolf-warriors really existed.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolves_in_Ireland – where would we be without wikipedia?  This article gives a short overview of wolves in Ireland, and some of this country’s mythology surrounding our furry friends.